Dastardly Double Feature Episode 3 – Chopping Mall & Blood Diner

ddf-logoEpisode three features a pair of awesomely excessive 80s favorites: Chopping Mall and Blood Diner.

Listen here, if you dare!

Halloween Scene: Old School Round-Up

bride-of-frankensteinAs I mentioned yesterday, I got to an early start when it came to watching horror movies this fall. So, I’ve got a lot to talk about! First, if you haven’t already, check out a pair of lists I wrote for CBR. One’s about movies and shows to follow Stranger Things up with while the other focused on the best classic horror movies to stream on Netflix and Amazon Prime!

Continue reading Halloween Scene: Old School Round-Up

Halloween Scene: Tales From The Darkside

tales-from-the-darkside-the-movieEarly this month I worked on a list for CBR that might eventually get published about the best classic horror movies to stream on Netflix and Amazon Prime. That lead to me watching Tales From The Darkside: The Movie for the first time and I think it’s up there with Body Bags as one of my all-time favorite horror anthology films!

That got me thinking about the George A. Romero-produced TV series than ran for four seasons from 1984-1988. Basically, a new take on the Twilight Zone/EC Comics, these half hour episodes offer a variety modern horrors many of which (at least in the first two discs) revolve around then-new technology like word processors, answering machines and multiple phone lines. Continue reading Halloween Scene: Tales From The Darkside

Halloween Scene: Universal’s Wolf Monsters

chaney-wolf-manI might have to rethink my position on werewolf movies. For a while, they just didn’t click with me, but after loving An American Werewolf In London and four Universal Monsters movies revolving around lycanthropes, I might be changing my tune! And thanks to picking up the big UM DVD set, I’ve been able to do a pretty deep dive on all (or most) things wolf from that era. Continue reading Halloween Scene: Universal’s Wolf Monsters

Halloween Scene: More Horror Comedy Craziness

jack-frost-2 After enjoying the stellar An American Werewolf In London and having fun with Tucker & Dale Vs. Evil as well as Blood Diner, I kept looking around at various horror comedies spanning a variety of decades and styles. Some horror comedies play with the tropes of the genre while others just go all out with craziness you can’t help but laugh at. And I think that Jack Frost 2: The Revenge Of The Mutant Killer Snowman does both! Continue reading Halloween Scene: More Horror Comedy Craziness

Halloween Scene: Tucker And Dale & Blood Diner

tucker-and-dale-vs-evilI realized after watching the wonderful An American Werewolf In London recently that my horror-comedy knowledge is pretty weak. I’m actually struggling to think of any non-Scary Movie entries that I’ve seen (which are really more “comedy”-horror and also terrible) besides Shaun Of The Dead, Joe Dante’s movies and Cabin In The Woods to some extent. Well, as it happens, I’ve seen a handful so far this season and have had a fair amount of success. Continue reading Halloween Scene: Tucker And Dale & Blood Diner

Halloween Scene: The Inhuman Condition by Clive Barker (1987)

the-inhuman-condition-clive-barkerI might be a longtime horror fan, but that doesn’t mean I’m fearless when it comes to this stuff. I shy away from plenty of subjects and subgenres that make me uncomfortable. For a while, Cliver Barker’s work has fit into that category. I’ve seen Hellraiser and Nigthbreed and maybe a few other adaptations of his work, but the sheet hopeless darkness of them just didn’t fit with what I wanted to see at the time.

And then a few of his books popped up on the free table at my local library and I figured it was time to embrace my fear and dive in. I decided to start with the short story book The Inhuman Condition which was published in 1987. I was blown away by this book, initially thinking it wasn’t as dark as I assumed it would be and then realizing Barker saved the harshest story for last. Continue reading Halloween Scene: The Inhuman Condition by Clive Barker (1987)