The High Five Episode 7 – ’50s Inspired Musicals From The ’80s…Mostly

Hi there cats and kittens, this week’s episode of The High Five podcast gets hep with a quintet of musicals from the 1980s that have roots going back to the 1950s! We have Happy Days and Grease to thank for these, plus the eventual power that kids who grew up in that older decade had in the latter one! This one was a real wild trip, but I had a gas putting it together!

Oh and if you want to list to the Spotify playlist I put together based on some of these films’ soundtracks, check it out!

Here’s a few cool pieces of Little Shop Of Horrors art too!

Quick Movie Review: Lost In Translation (2003)

lost in translation As a big fan of Bill Murray’s run on Saturday Night Live and classic 70s/80s comedies like Stripes, Caddyshack, Meatballs, Scrooged and, of course, the Ghostbusters movies, it was hard to accept him in what a younger version of me described as his “sad bastard” phase. In the late 90s I wasn’t paying nearly as much attention to the world of film as I do now, so the switch from things like Space Jam to Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums and Lost In Translation was a pretty big shock. It makes all the sense in the world to me now he felt the need to change his image a bit and wanted to show a different side of himself.

For what it’s worth, I’m not a big fan of the Wes Anderson movies I’ve seen, so I’m not into Murray’s performances in those movies because they’re just not my thing. But, I did enjoy him in Fantastic Mr. Fox and Zombieland, so I’m not entirely unfamiliar with the movies he’s made in the last decade. I’ve also seen at least one other Sofia Coppola movie, the moving The Virgin Suicides, so I was curious to see these two creators joining sources. Plus, who isn’t captivated by Scarlett Johansson?

And it really is a great film. I’m a huge fan of stories that take two characters who probably shouldn’t be together and create a believable atmosphere for them to interact within. That’s the case for married movie star Bob Harris (Murray) and photographer’s wife Charlotte (Johansson) who both happen to be staying in the same Tokyo hotel at the same time, wind up meeting, becoming friends and possibly more.

I like to call this a “staring out the window” movie because, well, there’s a lot of that going on. I don’t think that’s a bad thing at all because it means that the characters are contemplative. I mean, it’s a pretty obvious way of conveying that idea, but when you’re cooped up in a hotel room and surrounded by the fairly alien landscape of Tokyo, it works. The film also takes a somewhat leisurely pace, not rushing too fast, often getting into scenes that show how these characters act on their own, together just the two of them and also in larger groups. You notice little differences as you go which comes from getting so many creative people together to work on a story. Essentially, you get to see them grow as a couple, though a couple that probably shouldn’t be together.

While the “inappropriate” relationship is a big part of the story (they’re both married), another driving force of this movie is the idea of two people coming together in this environment that’s so separated from their normal lives. It’s only because they’re in this strange place that they come together. Because they’re so isolated, these people cling to one another and develop a relationship that wouldn’t happen otherwise. It’s a really interesting story and situation that asks a lot from its actors and delivers as far as I’m concerned.

Halloween Scene: Zombieland (2009)

It’s really strange write “2009” after a movie and then realizing that was last year. I don’t have the opportunity to write the date much, but it still blows my mind that it’s 2010. Where’s my hover board?!!! Okay, enough of that. I decided after working hard the last two days and this morning, that I would treat myself to a movie at the cheap theaters across the river. So, I got up, got tonight’s dinner in the crock pot, wrote a story for Marvel.com and then went on my way to the Spring Hills Mall in Poughkeepsie. Here’s the thing though, it’s not really a mall and I had a bitch of a time finding the place (it’s around back with a very tiny sign) and there’s another mall in the same general area. Eventually I found my way, paid my $2 and sat down in a theater that reminded me of the AMCs I used to go to as a kid, the kinds with an aisle right down the middle and a 90 person capacity. I thought I was going to be alone throughout the movie, but some people came in right as it was starting and sat behind me which made me paranoid for a second, then I realized that I wasn’t living in a horror movie (hopefully) and chilled out. This one got a little long, so hit the jump for the full review. Continue reading Halloween Scene: Zombieland (2009)