Bullet Points: Hot Rounds Of Information Goodness

whip_it_ellen_pageEllen Page might play Tara Chace in the big screen adaptation of Greg Rucka’s Queen & Country comic series. John Rogers (Leverage, Transformers) is currently working on the script. [via Variety]grudge match sylvester stallone robert de niro

Check out the first image from the Robert De Niro/Sylvester Stallone boxing comedy Grudge Match. [via USA Today]

Paramount announced that they snagged Snow White And The Huntsman writer Evan Daugherty to pen the third G.I. Joe film. Daugherty also did some re-writing on the upcoming Ninja Turtles reboot. [via Deadline]Bruce-Willis-RED

Even though he finds explosions boring these days, Bruce Willis is still signing on for more paychecks action films. The latest is called The Prince in which he plays a guy waiting for revenge on a mob enforcer who returns to Vegas to get his daughter back. Red Dawn writers Andre Fabrizio and Jeremy Passmore penned the script for director Sarik Andreasyan (American Heist). [via Collider]SNOWPIERCER_LE-TRANSPERCENEIGE-Affiche-def

Did you see the French poster for Snowpiercer? Well now you have! [via CloneWeb]

the gambler james caan

Word on the street is that Mark Wahlberg is in talks to star in a remake of the James Caan 1974 flick The Gambler with potential director Rupert Wyatt (Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes). [via Deadline]electric shadows vol 1

Electric Shadows blogger Jean Lukitsh wrote an e-book about the history of martial arts cinema that also features segments from the author’s personal memorabilia collection called Electric Shadows: The Secret History Of Kung Fu Movies Volume 1. The 69 page book is $2.99 on Amazon. [via Kung Fu Cinema]

Jamming With Whip It (2009)

Whip It’s one of those movies that seemed pretty interesting when I first heard about it (Drew Barrymore directing a roller derby movie starring Ellen Page and Kristen Wiig? sold), didn’t see it in the theaters and then took forever to actually see because it seems to be one of those flicks everyone wants to watch from Netflix so it takes forever to get. A friend of ours was waiting for a long time too. We both had the movie on the top of our queues. Last week I stopped in at Blockbuster to take advantage of their five for $25 deal and picked up My Bloody Valentine 3D (without glasses, so I ordered them), Punisher Wars Zone, (500) Days Of Summer, National Treasure 2 and Whip It. Just because it would be easier to spend the four bucks and see the damn thing.

In the end it wasn’t really worth the wait. I mean, it’s an alright movie, that does have an uplifting message at the end, but it’s pretty damn formulaic. Our heroine, Ellen Page, lies about her age to try out for the Austin roller derby teams. She makes it, her friend helps her with her lies, she meets a boy, she’s really good at roller derby and, as you would expect, everything comes crashing down on her and it looks like she won’t be able to play in the big game because, you guessed it, the beauty pageant she’s supposed to be in is the same day! Ugh. I could have outlined the movie ahead of time and had a drink every time I was right. If that were the case, I don’t think I’d be able to type right now.

It’s by no means a bad movie even though the plot is very been-there-done-that if you’ve been watching movies for a while. Barrymore does a serviceable job directing though the movie could have used some better editing. In one sequence, for example, the girls (Page and Arrested Development’s Alia Shawkat) are at a party, they’re both flirting with boys, one throws up and the next thing you know they’re in a bed together in a room alone. Is it at one of their houses? Is it the house the party was in? What is happening?

From what I’ve seen in the rad documentary Hell On Wheels (which I could have sworn I wrote about on here, but must have instead explained it in great detail to someone, probably the missus) which is about the real deal Austin roller derby women who helped kick this trend back into gear, the action and the game seem pretty legit, though I’m sure there’s stuff in there that upsets the roller derby aficionados (like when us geeks watch the X-Men movies and yell at the screen for the little things).

So, no, it’s not the most original movie in the world, but I would recommend it to anyone interested in roller derby (after watching Hell On Wheels, it is on Netflix Instant last I checked), roller derby fans, people who haven’t seen too many teen movies and every teenage girl ever. Too long has this kind of movie been the territory of men (I love how proud the dad is that his girl can knock some bitches out, just as proud as the neighbor with the football kids). I’d make this mandatory viewing for girls and will show it to mine if I ever have any on Holovision or whatever the hell we’ll be watching movies on in THE FUTURE (gotta say it like an old timey cartoon or it just doesn’t work). Also, bonus points for the Star Wars names that got snuck in like Jabba The Slutt and Princess Slayah. Well played.

Christopher Nolan Is Awesome

I’m not sure if Memento or Insomnia was the first Christopher Nolan movie I ever saw. I think it was when I saw 2000’s Memento my freshman year (2001-2002) of college (on DVD), but I’m not 100% sure on that because I definitely saw 2002’s Insomnia in the theater while home from college. Of course, I had no idea who Nolan was at the time, but both movies greatly affected me. I had seen plenty of movies that play with viewer perception before seeing Memento (like Usual Suspects or Lost Highway), but it quickly cemented itself in the vaunted list of movies that are awesome. After seeing Inception last night I thought about watching both movies again, but the thing about Nolan films is that they’re incredibly intense. After watching his movies, you not only feel like you’ve gone on a journey with the lead, but also feel drained because of it. With that in mind and the lateness of the hour, I decided to do something else and checked out his first feature-length movie called Following (1998) on Netflix Instant.

But first my thoughts on Inception. Don’t worry, there aren’t spoilers in here, but if you’re like me, you might want to keep avoiding any and all talk of the movie before seeing it so nothing gets ruined. I recommend that, actually. Anyway, I loved this movie. It’s just so versatile. The dream stuff is fascinating and really well thought out (you can tell Nolan has worked everything out in his head even if it’s not all on the screen). It’s just such a damn smart movie, there’s so much to think about and talk about. I just finished reading Cinematical’s list of theories and plot holes about what was actually going on. Honestly, though, I don’t really care. I just enjoyed sitting there and absorbing the whole experience (though the theater we went to had the volume up too loud and the screen seemed to be vibrating almost, which was less than ideal). What surprised me though was how action packed the movie was. You’ve got some superhero-ish fighting that made me wish Joseph Gordon-Levitt had played Spider-Man and a James Bondian winter assault that was just fantastic (actually better than anything in a Bond movie). And the whole thing is just so damn taut. You’re trying to keep up with the layers and the timing and the van is falling and what the hell was that and oh my god WALK FASTER! It’s really a stellar film that was expertly edited.

Okay, I can’t completely avoid SPOILERS, so here’s the only problem I had: how come the kick of flipping in the van (in the accident, not when it went off the bridge) didn’t wake anyone up? Also, how does a kick work if your physical body isn’t being kicked? I understand that the sedative allows inner ear functions to stay intact, but if you’re asleep in the dream world (which would put you two layers down) why would a kick work on you, especially if your inner ear isn’t actually being effected because you’re flying on a plane? I’m not saying these are plot holes, just things I didn’t get and might understand better when I watch the movie again, which I most certainly will when it comes out on DVD. For now, though, I’m just going to let it marinate.

I’m still kicking around the idea of doing a Nolan marathon thanks to Memento and Insomnia being on Netflix Instant and his two Batman flicks being in my DVD collection, but instead of watching something I’d already seen, I went with Following, a movie about a writer who winds up following a thief who befriends the writer and teaches him the ropes of breaking and entering. The film doesn’t have the same heady concepts as Nolan’s later films, but it’s by no means your average film. There’s a lot going on here with scenes being told out of chronological order, characters changing appearances and, as you might expect, bad things happening to the male lead.

I’m not sure if it’s the black and white-ness of the movie or the big city setting, but the movie kept reminding me of Darren Aronofsky’s Pi which came out the same year. They’re very different movies told in different styles, but they feel thematically similar as the two leads are following their obsessions down roads that get them into some trouble.

I really should give the movie another watch because I was kind of tired and not giving it my absolute full attention, but I think I ended up understanding the whole thing after some initial confusion (thanks to the non-linear storytelling).

Nolan’s first and last movies are pretty different, but you can tell they’re made by the same guy. With both movies, he starts chronologically later in the story and then jumps backwards in time to explain things. With Following, it’s the main character actually telling someone else what’s going on, with Inception, it’s in medias res and we eventually catch up. I’ve always been curious about this form of storytelling because it contains a bit of a spoiler, but you don’t really understand it until later on. For instance SPOILER in Inception, we see old Saito in the very beginning. We don’t know what it means at first, but once we’re told that dying in the dream world puts you in limbo where you get old and crazy, we know exactly what’s going to happen to Saito, so you spend the rest of the time he’s around wondering when he’s going to die. I wonder why some storytellers reveal their hand like that, but Nolan–in both movies–does an excellent job of dropping you into the story, giving you some clues and giving you so many other things to think about that you tend to forget those opening scenes, sometimes desperately trying to remember them to try and figure out what’s happening (were those his kids on the beach? did we see their faces? what happened to the top when the old man spun it? and on and on and on).

Writing this post has made me want to watch his filmography again which I could do today if the mood strikes. The only movie I don’t have easy access to is The Prestige, but that’s okay, 6 out of 7 ain’t bad.

UPDATE: Just saw that Insomnia actually isn’t on Netflix Instant. Not sure if I completely made that up or what, but sorry about the misinformation.