Toy Commercial Tuesday: More Superman Goodness

A few years back I took the time to spotlight the rad 90s Kenner Superman: The Man Of Steel line (that was probably only rad to kids like me who were HUGE Man of Steel fans). The line didn’t last very long, but it gave us some really interesting commercials. The one you see above has a lot of the same figure as seen in the previous post from four years ago, but with the added awesomeness of Superboy’s motorcycle. Why would he need one? He doesn’t! He just wants one, so take that!

Also, I dig how into it those kids are! They really nail the “Don’t Mess With The S” slogan and I’m pretty sure one of them is dressed exactly like Marty McFly in Back To The Future, so bonus points for that.

Finally, how crazy is it that Conduit has an action figure?

Superman Rebirth Trade Post: Action Comics & Superman

When it comes to DC Rebirth books, the Superman group, the Superman group stands apart. I’m not saying that as a longtime and devoted Man of Steel fan (though I am), but because the headline character is actually the version from the previous universe, as explained in Superman: Lois & Clark. Some time after that book, the New 52’s version of Superman seemingly died before DC launched their Rebirth initiative. In Superman Volume One: Son Of Superman and Superman: Action Comics Volume One: Path Of Doom, the previous incarnation of Superman leaves the black-and-silver suit behind, takes up the more familiar colors and makes his presence known to a world still reeling from his predecessor’s death. Continue reading Superman Rebirth Trade Post: Action Comics & Superman

New 52 Volume 1 Trade Post: Teen Titans, Superboy, Supergirl & Aquaman

teen titans vol 1 its our right to fightTeen Titans Volume 1: It’s Our Right To Fight (DC)
Written by Scott Lobdell, drawn by Brett Booth
Collects New 52 Teen Titans #1-7

I’m gonna try something a little different with this trade post: more books with shorter reviews. Let’s see how that works. As I mentioned when I read a bunch of the New 52 #1 issues, this book was one of my favorites. To me, the whole point of relaunching your entire universe is to offer readers something completely new. Some of the New 52 books don’t bother doing much of that from what I’ve seen, but Scott Lobdell does something really cool here. Instead of playing Batman’s sidekick, Tim Drake is running around as Red Robin in an attempt to save superpowered kids from N.O.W.H.E.R.E. This leads him to joining forces with fellow young costumed heroes like Wonder Girl (don’t call her Wonder Girl), Kid Flash, Bunker and Skitter. What I really like about this book is that Lobdell really just throws you into the story and doesn’t slow down too much, but still offers enough information to enjoy.

The whole book revolves around a series of mysteries large and small that continue to draw me in issue after issue. Why is the non-powered Drake so interested in helping super-kids? Why does Wonder Girl dislike being called Wonder Girl so much? Who is N.O.W.H.E.R.E. and what is their game? What’s the deal with these new characters? What’s going to happen with Superboy?

All of the above makes this a very 90s feeling book, but I don’t mean that in a negative way. People dump on the 90s a lot, but there was a lot of newness being explored in those books without getting too far wrapped around itself. And, even though this is technically a “putting the team together” story, it’s done in a less traditional way and it revolves around a less traditional team, so I don’t mind as much. Also in the 90s vein, I love Brett Booth’s art in this book. He’s got a huge amount of detail and never skimps when it comes to either background or characters. That kind of detail is fantastic and not always easy to nail.

superboy vol 1 incubationSuperboy Volume 1: Incubation (DC)
Written by Scott Lobdell, drawn by R.B. Silva
Collects New 52 Superboy #1-7

I was less into Lobdell’s Superboy, though I’m not sure if I can exactly put my finger on why. It’s a completely different kind of story. While Teen Titans is an on-the-run, putting-things-together-as-we-go kind of thing featuring an aloof clone created in an attempt to make their own Superman who’s trying to figure out who he wants to be and what he wants to do with his newfound life and power.

I think one of the reasons I wasn’t as taken with the series is because it feels a lot more “monster of the week.” Superboy wakes up and they send him after King Shark, then they send him after another villain. When he’s talking to the woman who gets revealed as Fairchild (originally from Gen 13) and Ravager or is out in the world trying to figure out if he’s good or bad, those are much more interesting moments for me. Still, I like that this and Teen Titans lead up to a bigger story called “The Culling” that I look forward to reading eventually. He’s an interesting character with a lot in there to check out.

On the art side of things, I don’t know if Silva’s style is really the kind of thing I dig. It’s cartoony and stylized which I like, but at times it feels a little too un-detailed, like you’re just looking at shapes strung together without as much physical continuity.

supergirl vol 1 last daughter of kryptonSupergirl Volume 1: Last Daughter Of Krypton (DC)
Written by Michael Green & Mike Johnson, drawn by Mahmud Asrar & Bill Reinhold
Collects New 52 Supergirl #1-7

I have an interesting history with Supergirl. I dug Peter David’s book, but never really read it on the regular (though I do want to go back and read the whole run in order). Then, when they brought a new version of Superman’s cousin into continuity, I was not into it because I was still a continuity nut at the time and wanted Kal-El to be the only Kryptonian around. I liked how they came up with interesting ways to have a Superboy and Supergirl in the 90s and didn’t want to see that change. Anyway, the idea of Superman’s cousin coming to Earth is one I eventually came to accept, but now that we’re dealing with an all new continuity (and I don’t care nearly as much about the details as I used to) I’m cool with it.

And I think Green and Johnson do a good job with this story. The whole thing is a fish out of water tale with Kara landing on Earth thinking she’s going to protect her younger cousin Kal, who is now Superman. It’s a lot to deal with for a girl who was kind of aimless on Krypton, especially because she doen’st speak the language.

Unlike Superboy, this book is much more of a journey story with Supergirl interacting with different characters offering her different pieces of information to help her figure out exactly what’s going on with her, ultimately leading to another planet. By the end of the journey presented in this trade Kara has a bit of an understanding as to what she wants to do with her weird new life. A life wonderfully drawn by Mahmud Asrar (for the most part) who has a cool kind of indie style that captures Kara’s fragility and strength while also balancing giant robots, monsters and pretty girls. After reading this book I decided that The Big Bang Theory‘s Kaley Cuoco should play Supergirl. Someone make that happen.

aquaman vol 1 the trenchAquaman Volume 1: The Trench (DC)
Written by Geoff Johns, drawn by Ivan Reis with Joe Prado
Collects Aquaman #1-6

Unlike Supergirl, I had a much deeper relationship with Aquaman (also written by Peter David come to think of it). His lengthy run on that book is pretty much the be all, end all for me as far as that character is concerned. Still, when I heard that Geoff Johns, writer of some of my all time favorite comics (JSA, Green Lantern), was tackling the character I was definitely interested. And you  know what, he does a great job which I’m sure is a shock to no one.

The New 52 version of Aquaman doesn’t seem all that different from the original, a much simpler, more streamlined version. He’s new to the surface world which is good timing considering a race of hyper violent humanoid fish creatures have risen from the depths to kidnap, eat and kill people. While that adventure is an interesting one, I really liked some of the book’s other elements. The waitress being surprised that Aquaman wants fish and chips made me chuckle, then you’ve got the whole issue of Aquaman in the desert which was a great idea. There’s also a lot going on with Atlantis and Mera that makes me curious about what’s coming up. And, man, Ivan Reis kills this art. He’ detailed like book, but with a darker edge that fits the book both thematically and environmentally.

Overall, I lucked out with this crop of New 52 backs. Each one took a different approach to introducing these new versions of old characters. It’s interesting to take a closer look at that aspect of the storytelling and analyze which ones I like better than others. I look forward to reading the second volumes of all of these books…eventually and if I can get my hands on them.

Revisiting Superboy And The Ravers

Back in the mid-90s there were two teen superhero team books from DC that captured my imagination: the Dan Jurgens Teen Titans and Superboy and the Ravers. Both books seemed really cool and featured new, young characters that I figured I could relate to at the ripe old age of 13. However, I was working with a pretty tight budget when it came to comics and could only get issues here and there. As such, I collected most of both short-lived series’. It wasn’t until my pal, CBR mastermind and Cool Kids Table blogger Kiel Phegley sent me a a box o’ stuff that included all 19 issues of SATR that I was able to read the entire series from front to back.

And you know what? It was a surprisingly fun read. The concept might seem kind of silly and very of-the-times today — an intergalactic party that teenagers with super powers can teleport to on a whim centered around one of the most 90s characters around, Superboy — but it actually did some fun stuff with characters who weren’t really being used, based new ones on existing ideas and dealt with issues like coming out of the closet and trying to fit in.

The run was written by Karl Kesel and Steve Mattsson with artists Paul Pelletier (1-9, 13, 14) and Josh Hood (#15-19). It also boasts fill-ins by Aaron Lopresti (#11, 12) and Ramon Bernado (#10, the Meltdown crossover) and even a back up story by Jim Aparo and Todd Nauk pencils on the final issue. In addition to

One of the things that impressed me most about the book is that it actually doens’t focus too much on Superboy in favor of original characters Hero Cruz (who eventually gets the H Dial!), Rex the Wonder Dog, the magnetically powered Aura, the only good guy on Qward Kaliber, New Blood Sparx and alien-created ectoplasmic goo guy Half-Life. The writers do an excellent job balancing each character’s story with the larger one of trying to figure out exactly why the guy throwing this rave, Kindred Marx, is doing so and why intergalactic cops InterC.E.P.T. want to put him out of business. I actually get the feeling that Kesel and Mattsson wanted to create this book with all original characters and maybe editorial liked it but wanted to see a known/popular character thrown in to boost sales.

While re-reading this run I realized that this book might have started my love of the Dial H For Hero concept. I don’t know where else I would have seen it and definitely read some of these issues well before I got into Will Pfeifer’s excellent series HERO. I just think it’s such a neat concept with all kinds of potential. Speaking of which, anyone read the current series? I’m very curious to check it out. I also think this might be one of the first comics I read with a gay character and was surprised at the honest reaction Sparx had when Hero came out to her, difficult as it was to read.

At the end of the day, I had a good time reading this series again, but I don’t want it to sound like I unearthed a forgotten classic. A while ago I realized that there have been teen team comics that appeal to the younger generation reading said comics for decades and that while those books can become all-time favorites for those kids, they might not read well for people from other generations. For me, this is a nice little time capsul that did some interesting things, but I don’t think I’d hand it to a younger or much older reader and expect for them to dig it as much as me.

DUMP, KEEP OR BIND: When it comes to loose comics like this, the question I have after reading through them is first, “Do I want to keep these comics?” followed by, “Do I want to get them bound?” I’ll definitely keep these issues around, but they’re incredibly low on the list of books I want to pay to get put together in a nice hardcover package. I would however consider using them as a test run for trying my hand at home binding. I mean, these issues aren’t that hard to find, I could replace them for cheap if I screwed up the binding and I actually have at least half of them in my collection back home, making SATR a great self-binding project.