Ed Brubaker Trade Post: Daredevil Ultimate Collection Volume 1, X-Men: Deadly Genesis & The Books Of Doom

daredevil brubaker ultimate collection vol 1 Daredevil By Ed Brubaker & Michael Lark Ultimate Collection – Book 1 (Marvel)
Written by Ed Brubaker, drawn by Michael Lark, Stefano Gaudiano & David Aja
Collects Daredevil #82-93

About a month or so back I decided to give Ed Brubaker’s Captain America run a full read-through. While I’ve been enjoying that experience, there have been a few gaps which I decided to fill with more Brubaker comics from the library.

Up first is this collection of his first 12 issues of Daredevil. If you’re not familiar, Bru picked right up where Brian Michael Bendis left off which involved a story element that saw Matt Murdock being outed as the vigilante and a case being built against him. That of course meant he had to go to jail, but how would that work?

Brubaker’s first arc deals with Matt’s slow descent into madness in a place where such things are common. Believing his best friend has been killed because of him, Matt plunges headlong into prison fights and unlikely team-ups with Kingpin and Punisher. After using a prison riot to mask his escape, our hero then heads out of the country to find out who had his friend murdered. Continue reading Ed Brubaker Trade Post: Daredevil Ultimate Collection Volume 1, X-Men: Deadly Genesis & The Books Of Doom

Fantastic Voayage: Fantastic Four #6 (1962)

FANTASTIC FOUR #6 (1962)
Written by Stan Lee, drawn by Jack Kirby

Much like the first appearance of Doctor Doom in Fantastic Four #5, the supposedly epic team-up between big bads Doctor Doom and Namor came off less awesome than I hoped. First off, Doctor Doom comes across Namor as he’s swimming with dolphins. Soon after the pair decide to team up and you can see Doc Doom rubbing Namor’s shoulders, consoling him like they’re both battered women in a Lifetime movie. So what’s the nefarious plan? Destroy small continent with the Fantastic Four at the epicenter? Nope. Flood New York City and hope to get the FF? Nope. Plant a device in the Baxter Building that will shoot it and all inside into space.

ToyFare fans might remember this gag as being Doctor Doom’s go-to trick in the pages of Twisted ToyFare Theater. That’s where I first experienced the story element. I thought it was pretty funny and figured it was based on maybe an aspect of one of Doom’s plots, but never imagined it was lifted directly from an issue of FF. For that, the issue was fun to read.

I also enjoyed a few of the smaller moments. You see a few guys who don’t believe that FF actually exist. I think these kinds of moments are dumb when done in big shared superhero universes today (how could anyone not know that Batman exists, he’s on the friggin’ JLA), but it makes sense in the early days of the growing Marvel Universe. I also liked seeing a full building schematic of the FF headquarters as well as Sue using a special belt device to gain entrance. I think my favorite moment, though, was when Mr. Fantastic stretched from their HQ across NYC to pop in and talk with a sick fan who asks him about their costumes! This is probably the first explanation of Unstable Molecules and I like how fanboyish the set-up is. The kid isn’t being Comic Book Guy and trying to poke holes in things, he’s just curious. I like that. Aside from those moments, there’s more sad sack Ben Grimm and the usual Silver Age goofiness.

The one thing that bums me out a bit about reading these stories is that Jack Kirby hasn’t come into his distinct, kinetic, amazing style, the one I’ve come to know and love over the past few years. You can see little bits of pieces of what’s to come in some of the inventions and machinery, but Thing still looks like a lump of rock and Doom’s no where near as cool as my idea of Kirby in his prime drawing that villain. I can’t wait to see him really come into his own on this book, though I hear it doesn’t happen still for a little while. Ah well, I can stick around.

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Fantastic Voyage: Fantastic Four #5 (1962)

FANTASTIC FOUR #4 (1962)
Written by Stan Lee, drawn by Jack Kirby

Sorry for the incredible gap between Fantastic Voyage posts. I was shocked to discover that it had been about six months since I talked about Fantastic Four #4. Thanks to a new app I downloaded called Bookman Lite, I can now read PDFs on my iPhone. I just transferred over a few I had on my desktop from the awesome DVD I own that contains every FF and Silver Surfer comic from 1961 to 2005. The experience was actually pretty awesome. I’ve read plenty of comics in PDF form, but this was cool because they’re high res scans of issues that you can really zoom in on and look at, maybe even better than you could with a hard copy.

So, I got back into the game with a pretty landmark issue: the first appearance of Doctor Doom. I assumed he’d be behind some insanely complicated plot for taking over the world, but not so much. Instead he puts an electrified net around the FF headquarters, asks for (and is given) Sue, then takes the male FFers to his headquarters where he reveals his nefarious plan: the send them back in time to steal Blackbeard’s treasure chest. Huh? Really? So, that’s what they do, only Mr. Fantastic pulls some verbal trickery, noting that Doom only asked for the CHEST not the treasure itself. Oh that Reed, so sneaky.

Yes it’s got a good deal of Silver Age goofiness (Doom’s helicopter is alternately painted bright blue or pink with a shark face on it), but it’s also kind of fun seeing Mr. Fantastic, Thing and Human Torch using their powers while dressed up like pirates at the end. Also, as with the previous four issues, poor Ben Grimm has a hard time of things, first with Johnny comparing him to a comic book starring something called The Hulk (see the slideshow below) and then in the past when it turns out that he’s actually Blackbeard and he wants to stay there as a pirate only to get foiled by a storm (he even had his men restrain his teammates in ways that don’t actually make any sense).

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All in all, this was a really fun issue. I especially liked seeing the early building blocks that would go into making Dr. Doom one of the greatest villains around. The addition of the pirate setting was fun to see through the pencil of Jack Kirby, but I just keep thinking about how much better they would look if Kirby in his prime was drawing them. Ah well, we’ll get there!

Trade Post: Umbrella Academy Dallas, Goon Fancy Pants Vol. 1 & Iron Man Doom Quest

UMBRELLA ACADEMY: DALLAS (Dark Horse)
Written by Gerard Way, drawn by Gabriel Ba
Collects UA: Dallas 1-6
Okay, here’s the the thing. I didn’t actually read the Dallas trade, but the single issues. This is how we used to do Bookshelf back in the Wizard days. Being in the research department it fell on me to go through the massive, unorganized comic book library and dig up all the single issues from so many months back. It was terrible and dusty and hot up there, but when I wasn’t forced to dig for comics, I would do that anyway because it’s the most well stocked comic library I’ve ever seen. Anyway, I was a big fan of the first Umbrella Academy series Apocalypse Suite. Who would have thought that a rock star would write such a rad story? Anyway, I picked up the single issues as they came out, but waited to read them all at once and had a great time. Dallas isn’t an easy story to explain, but it picks up shortly after the previous story with family members going their separate ways. The main thrust of the story has to do with time travel and what happened to the diminutive #5 on his way back from the far future in the previous story. Like Apocalypse Suite, Dallas covers all kinds of territory from the aforementioned time travel to heavy-duty sci-fi killers to cartoon-headed assassins. It’s got a kind of Grant Morrison feel to it, without being as confusing. And man, Ba’s art is just sick. Way gives him all kinds of fun things to draw and I love seeing how they work together. This probably isn’t a very informative review, but if you liked the original, you’ll like Dallas and if you haven’t read either, go pick them up. Stat. Did the trade have any cool extras? I’ll get it on my shelf eventually.

THE GOON FANCY PANTS EDITION VOL. 1 (Dark Horse)
Written & drawn by Eric Powell
Collects Goon #1, 2 (Albatross), Goon #1, 3, 5, 9 (DH)
It might be hard to imagine nowadays, but even just a few years ago, Wizard magazine had the ability to help boost a book into more readers’ consciousnesses. The Goon was one of those books. It was really popular around the Wizard offices and ended up getting some pretty good coverage in the mag which helped boost the book’s sales. As a thank you for the coverage, Dark Horse and/or Powell sent the Wizard office a big box of these hardcover Fancy Pants books. I actually came in towards the end of most of this, but I benefited from it on one of my first days when a buddy handed me this volume. For some reason it took me almost four years to actually read it. I think one of the big reasons I didn’t get to it sooner is because the book reprints everything in chronological order and not as the issues came out. You can see above that the issues skip around a lot. I know some people like to read comics that way, but it puts me off going in. But, my reading experience wasn’t hindered once I actually started into this book (which Powell signed!).

As it turns out, this book is completely up my alley and awesome. The Goon killed a mobster who killed his carnie family. Now he’s got the mobster’s debt book and goes around acting like he’s working for the mobster and keeping the money for himself. He’s also assisted by his little buddy Frankie who used to be a wuss and, kind of like the kid from Son Of Rambow, now loves violence. The world is a kind of dirty, rundown version of what you might think of a larger small town back in the 40s, but with zombies. So, in addition to laying into mobsters, Goon also gets to slice, dice and punch his way through armies of zombies. I have no idea how much this book costs now, but it makes me want to get either the regular trades or the next Fancy Pants volume.

MARVEL PREMIERE CLASSIC VOL. 10 IRON MAN: DOOMQUEST (Marvel)
Written by David Michelinie & Bob Layton, drawn by Bob Layton & John Romita Jr.
Collects Iron Man Vol. 1 #149-150, 249-250
My love of Michelinie and Layton’s Iron Man is well documented in my Iron Mongering posts (find them all in the drop down to the right). As such, my buddy Ben got me this book for Christmas last year, which was super nice of him.Doomquest is definitely an interesting book, especially because the two two-issue stories have 100 issues between them. The basic idea is that the first two issues send Iron Man and Dr. Doom back into the times of Camelot where they have to deal with King Arthur and Morgana Le Fey and all that. The second two issues have them rocketing into the future where King Arthur has been reborn as a kid (as legend says will happen) along with a much hipper Merlin. This really is a wild little book. M&L nail Dr. Doom’s character. He’s just as arrogant and conniving as you would expect him to be, but in both stories he’s thrown out of his elements and has to make allegeiances he normally wouldn’t. Of all their comics I’ve read, I think this one might be the easiest to just jump right in and read because of the time travel. Aside from some stuff in the very first issue, you’re pretty much in these vastly different settings the whole time, so you’re learning things as the characters do. Well, for the most part. Iron Man 2020 kind of shows up in the future stuff. That part is kind of a combination of Camelot 3000 and any other Marvel story set in the future of the 616 where the legacies of the heroes live on in weird ways. I loved the book, but it also really makes me wish Marvel would start putting out more complete M&L runs in a Visionaries kind of series.