BULLET POINTS: HOT ROUNDS OF INFORMATION GOODNESS

teenage mutant ninja turtles TMNTThe Michael Bay-produced Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles flick from director Jonathan Liebesman got pushed back to August 8, 2014. This movie’s getting moved around more than the Turtle Van on patrol. Is there any hope it will be good? [via THR]

Lone Ranger 1

Word on the street is that Disney’s so pissed about the The Lone Ranger not making it’s money back yet that they’re restructuring their deal with producer Jerry Bruckheimer. In the past, his contract said that he had final cut, but that might not be the case anymore with Pirates Of The Caribbean 5. [TheWrap]

CW’s DC Comics-based Arrow is recruiting The Killing actress Bex Taylor-Klaus to play a  character called Sin. In the comics, Sin is a girl trained for years to replace super-assassin Lady Shiva who gets adopted by Black Canary. [via THR]

Speaking of Greg Berlanti-created shows, the futuristic prison series Paradise got snatched up by NBC. Berlanti’s teaming up with Seth Grahame-Smith (Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter) to make the Prison Break-like show set in a version of Las Vegas that’s been converted into a giant prison. [via Deadline]

seventh son jeff bridges

Divorces can be rough, especially when kids are involved. When Legendary split from Warners earlier this summer, some of the films the former financed were left without distribution. That was the case with Sergei Bodrov’s The Seventh Son, but don’t worry, the Jeff Bridges film will now be distributed by Legendary’s new partner Universal. [via TheWrap]

Warner Bros. snatched up a pitch by Mark L. Smith (Vacancy) called Herald about a Viking king that Leonardo DiCaprio may or may not play. [via Deadline]

james cameron poster blue lady

James Cameron revealed to Visionaries that he was thinking of blue ladies well before he came up with the idea for Avatar. [via Movies.com]

hercules set

Dig this crazy set from Brett Ratner’s Hercules. [via Dwayne Johnson’s Twitter]

Finally, this video reenacts the Peter/Chicken fight from Family Guy as performed by stuntwomen  Jessie Graff and Tree O’Toole. [via Topless Robot]

We Want Action: Django Unchained (2012) & Gangster Squad (2013)

django unchained I’m a big fan of Quentin Tarantino’s films. I certainly don’t like all of his movies equally — Jackie Brown and Death Proof don’t really do it for me — but I rank the rest of them in the Awesome category. Reservoir Dogs was my first and still one of my all time favorite films, Pulp Fiction is a classic, Kill Bill is both an amazing homage and also a brilliant bit of bloody goodness and Inglourious Basterds is so wonderful I can still write the title correctly. I’m actually surprised that I haven’t reviewed any of his other movies here on the blog, but I think part of that stems from the idea that a lot of ink has already been spilled on Tarantino’s career and I’ve found that some things are just so close to my heart that I don’t want to write about them. Sometimes you just want to keep something for your self.

I thought about skipping a review for Django Unchained, Tarantino’s first western, but after thinking about it for awhile, I decided to dive in a bit. If you haven’t seen the movie, do it. It bummed me out that I had to wait as long as I did to see this movie, but that’s what happens when you have a kid and no babysitter. The story revolves around bounty hunter King Schultz (Christoph Waltz) buying slave Django (Jamie Foxx) in an effort to track down a particular bounty. Along the way, Schultz trains Django to become a bounty hunter and the pair become friends to the point where Django tells King that he wants to track down his wife Broomhilda (Kerry Washington) who was sold to Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio) a plantation owner who gets his kicks from watching slaves beat each other to death.

Considering the setting and the director, you probably have a pretty good idea of what you’re getting with this movie and it’s truly not for the faint of heart. Even I was impressed with how much blood was spilled in this film, mostly through old school gunfights and a few fights. And, as you’ve probably heard, the language is very of-the-time which translates into “incredibly racist.”

But the real heart of the story revolves around a man taking advantage of every opportunity to find the love of his life. He’ll act like a slave trader himself, he’ll kill people, he’ll play nice with the man who enslaved his wife. But, when the chips are down and it’s time to pull through, Django does everything he can to achieve his goal. Foxx does a terrific job in his role as does, well, everyone else in the whole movie. As you can expect there’s some touchy areas here, but everyone really commits to their parts and Tarantino directed them deftly. All around, Tarantino once again shows how good he can be at taking a genre he loves, mixing in his own sensibilities and even his own take on history and creating something that’s both emotionally satisfying and also fun to watch.

gangster squad poster Gangster Squad also takes viewers to a time in our country’s past and features a heckuva hero. This time we’re in 1949 LA which has been overrun with gangsters like Mickey Cohen (Sean Penn). But there’s still a few good cops around like Sgt. John O’Mara (Josh Brolin) who’s a heard headed justice seeker unafraid to mix it up with the bad guys in an effort to keep his city safe. The police chief (Nick Nolte) realizes this and offers him a chance to go after Cohen and company, but only off the books. O’Mara puts a team together that includes guys played by Ryan Gosling, Anthony Mackie, Giovonni Ribisi, Michael Pena and Robert Patrick who do just that.

The film, directed Ruben Fleischer (Zombieland), is actually based on real life events from the time, but, of course, punched up for more Hollywood goodness. Emma Stone plays both sides of the fence as one of Cohen’s regular lady friends and faling for Gosling’s character (who can blame her). The story bobs and weaves around, actually taking on a lot of the same story beats seen in Warren Beatty’s Dick Tracy (a longtime favorite of mine, gotta check out that Blu-ray).

As I noted in this week’s episode of the Pop Poppa Nap Cast, posted over on my dad blog Pop Poppa, I really appreciated the bravery these men exemplified in their attempts to clean up the city. O’Mara’s the kind of classic hero we don’t see much of anymore. He does the right thing because it’s right and good and the only gain he gets out of it is the ability to live in a better world…assuming he doesn’t get killed along the way. All the other guys on the squad have similar motivations, wanting to make the world a better place for their kids, the people in their neighborhood and the like. They’re real, old school heroes who also happen to look and talk slick, shoot well and fight even better. Once again that mix of heart and action really gets me. It also helps that this movie is freaking gorgeous and looks amazing on Blu-ray, as did Django though I didn’t mention above.

Christopher Nolan Is Awesome

I’m not sure if Memento or Insomnia was the first Christopher Nolan movie I ever saw. I think it was when I saw 2000’s Memento my freshman year (2001-2002) of college (on DVD), but I’m not 100% sure on that because I definitely saw 2002’s Insomnia in the theater while home from college. Of course, I had no idea who Nolan was at the time, but both movies greatly affected me. I had seen plenty of movies that play with viewer perception before seeing Memento (like Usual Suspects or Lost Highway), but it quickly cemented itself in the vaunted list of movies that are awesome. After seeing Inception last night I thought about watching both movies again, but the thing about Nolan films is that they’re incredibly intense. After watching his movies, you not only feel like you’ve gone on a journey with the lead, but also feel drained because of it. With that in mind and the lateness of the hour, I decided to do something else and checked out his first feature-length movie called Following (1998) on Netflix Instant.

But first my thoughts on Inception. Don’t worry, there aren’t spoilers in here, but if you’re like me, you might want to keep avoiding any and all talk of the movie before seeing it so nothing gets ruined. I recommend that, actually. Anyway, I loved this movie. It’s just so versatile. The dream stuff is fascinating and really well thought out (you can tell Nolan has worked everything out in his head even if it’s not all on the screen). It’s just such a damn smart movie, there’s so much to think about and talk about. I just finished reading Cinematical’s list of theories and plot holes about what was actually going on. Honestly, though, I don’t really care. I just enjoyed sitting there and absorbing the whole experience (though the theater we went to had the volume up too loud and the screen seemed to be vibrating almost, which was less than ideal). What surprised me though was how action packed the movie was. You’ve got some superhero-ish fighting that made me wish Joseph Gordon-Levitt had played Spider-Man and a James Bondian winter assault that was just fantastic (actually better than anything in a Bond movie). And the whole thing is just so damn taut. You’re trying to keep up with the layers and the timing and the van is falling and what the hell was that and oh my god WALK FASTER! It’s really a stellar film that was expertly edited.

Okay, I can’t completely avoid SPOILERS, so here’s the only problem I had: how come the kick of flipping in the van (in the accident, not when it went off the bridge) didn’t wake anyone up? Also, how does a kick work if your physical body isn’t being kicked? I understand that the sedative allows inner ear functions to stay intact, but if you’re asleep in the dream world (which would put you two layers down) why would a kick work on you, especially if your inner ear isn’t actually being effected because you’re flying on a plane? I’m not saying these are plot holes, just things I didn’t get and might understand better when I watch the movie again, which I most certainly will when it comes out on DVD. For now, though, I’m just going to let it marinate.

I’m still kicking around the idea of doing a Nolan marathon thanks to Memento and Insomnia being on Netflix Instant and his two Batman flicks being in my DVD collection, but instead of watching something I’d already seen, I went with Following, a movie about a writer who winds up following a thief who befriends the writer and teaches him the ropes of breaking and entering. The film doesn’t have the same heady concepts as Nolan’s later films, but it’s by no means your average film. There’s a lot going on here with scenes being told out of chronological order, characters changing appearances and, as you might expect, bad things happening to the male lead.

I’m not sure if it’s the black and white-ness of the movie or the big city setting, but the movie kept reminding me of Darren Aronofsky’s Pi which came out the same year. They’re very different movies told in different styles, but they feel thematically similar as the two leads are following their obsessions down roads that get them into some trouble.

I really should give the movie another watch because I was kind of tired and not giving it my absolute full attention, but I think I ended up understanding the whole thing after some initial confusion (thanks to the non-linear storytelling).

Nolan’s first and last movies are pretty different, but you can tell they’re made by the same guy. With both movies, he starts chronologically later in the story and then jumps backwards in time to explain things. With Following, it’s the main character actually telling someone else what’s going on, with Inception, it’s in medias res and we eventually catch up. I’ve always been curious about this form of storytelling because it contains a bit of a spoiler, but you don’t really understand it until later on. For instance SPOILER in Inception, we see old Saito in the very beginning. We don’t know what it means at first, but once we’re told that dying in the dream world puts you in limbo where you get old and crazy, we know exactly what’s going to happen to Saito, so you spend the rest of the time he’s around wondering when he’s going to die. I wonder why some storytellers reveal their hand like that, but Nolan–in both movies–does an excellent job of dropping you into the story, giving you some clues and giving you so many other things to think about that you tend to forget those opening scenes, sometimes desperately trying to remember them to try and figure out what’s happening (were those his kids on the beach? did we see their faces? what happened to the top when the old man spun it? and on and on and on).

Writing this post has made me want to watch his filmography again which I could do today if the mood strikes. The only movie I don’t have easy access to is The Prestige, but that’s okay, 6 out of 7 ain’t bad.

UPDATE: Just saw that Insomnia actually isn’t on Netflix Instant. Not sure if I completely made that up or what, but sorry about the misinformation.

Book Vs. Movie: Shutter Island

It’s been a year or two since I read Dennis Lehane’s 2003 novel Shutter Island, so my memories are a little fuzzy. I do remember liking it. A lot. So much so, that I pretty much knocked the whole thing out over a weekend. That’s no small feat for me, as I read about as fast as a toddler going through his first Sesame Street book. There was a frenetic pace and such a deep level of intrigue in the novel, though, that I could barely put it down. Even the missus marveled at the speed with which I dispatched the book.

The book follows two U.S. Marshalls as they investigate an unusual escape on Shutter Island, a mental institute off the coast of Massachusetts near Boston. As the story progresses we learn more and more about our hero Teddy Daniels and the patients and doctors who keep Shutter Island in business. I will say that I highly recommend the book for anyone who enjoys mysteries, psychological adventures and perfectly crafted twist endings.

Shutter Island is a difficult book to talk about without revealing the surprise ending, so consider the rest of this review to be filled with SPOILERS until the last paragraph. Towards the end of the book (maybe 2/3 or 3/4 of the way through, maybe someone with a better memory can help me out with the exact moment) we find out that Teddy is actually insane. Leading up to this point, we’re made to think that Teddy is actually being persecuted by the government for looking too much into Shutter Island, which he thinks of as a place where experimental surgeries are performed on the insane. Lehane writes this so well and gets us so much on Teddy’s side that when the doctor first tells him he’s not only no longer a Marshall, but he’s been on Shutter Island as a patient for two years, we don’t believe him, but soon enough, we realize that Lehane and Teddy have both taken us for a ride, one with his incredible writing, the other with his delusions. In the great history of surprise twists, I’d say it’s more like The Usual Suspects where it doesn’t make everything you’ve just seen pointless, but allows you to examine it in a different light on further reading. I’ll talk more about the twist in a moment.

It seemed like just a few weeks after I finished the book, it came out that Martin Scorsese would be directing a movie version with Leoardo DiCaprio and Mark Ruffalo playing the Marshalls. I was curious to see how the whole thing would play out and found out over the weekend when watching the movie on On Demand with the missus and her parents at their house in New Hampshire. Damn, it was great. There’s always a concern with great directors that, as they age, they lose their magic, but Scorsese doesn’t seem to have that problem, thankfully.

The film version had such a fantastic sense of atmosphere the entire time. Something was wrong and we just didn’t know what it was, unless, of course, you read the book or know the twist ending in which case you know why and it’s fun to see how it’s played out. Watching the movie, I felt like I did the second time I watched Usual Suspects (I love that movie, if you couldn’t tell already). I knew what all the sideways glances really meant and why people were acting funny and just like that movie, it all works. Scorses even goes so far as to make some really strange edits like a woman drinking from a glass of what that was just handed to her, but isn’t there, to capture how things get fuzzy for Teddy. He’s got sufficient mental problems that keep him out of regular society and that comes across the second time around.

Overall, I was very impressed with everyone’s performances–Ben Kingsley, Max von Sydow and Michelle Williams are also in the flick–along with Scorcese’s direction which captured the feelings I remember when reading the book. Most importantly, he pulled the twist ending off without it feeling too out-of-nowhere. Like I said there were so many “huh?” moments early on that, once the twist is revealed, they make sense, like why does Ruffalo have such trouble getting his holster off his belt? In the book, the key to the twist was getting us so far on Teddy’s side that the mere idea of the truth just doesn’t seem possible until we get all the real information and discover one of the basic rules of literature and storytelling: never trust a first person narrator. In this case, Teddy believes he’s telling the truth and really does believe he’s seeing the people he’s seeing, but, as we learn, that’s just not the case. I like how well first Lehane, then Scorcese handled putting the audience so far on Teddy’s side and then launching us over to the doctor’s side. Well done all around.

So, now that we’re out of spoiler territory, I recommend both the book and the movie, though try not get the end ruined for you. It’s a lot of fun to experience it unadulterated for the very first time and then to experience it again to see what’s really what from the beginning.