Trade Pile: Black Canary, 3 Geeks & Harlan Ellison

It’s been way too long since I wrote about comics here on the site, so let’s jump back in. Between library borrows, my existing To-Read boxes (roughly two long boxes at current count) and the recent discovery of a store that sells super cheap trades, I’ve got a lot to read. Let’s get into it!

Continue reading Trade Pile: Black Canary, 3 Geeks & Harlan Ellison

Y: The Last Man Deluxe Volume 3 Trade Post

Y The Last Man Deluxe Volume 3Y: The Last Man Deluxe Volume 3 (Vertigo/DC)
Written by Brian K. Vaughan, drawn by Pia Guerra with Paul Chadwick & Goran Sudzuka
Collects Y: The Last Man #24-36

Re-reading Y: The Last Man has been an interesting experience (peep my reviews of the first and second volumes of the deluxe hardcovers for more background information and my thoughts on those books). One of the most interesting aspects of this read-through is that I’m starting to see some of the book’s problems. Y is one of those books that is so revered that you forget that it has its flaws, some of which I also saw in Ex Machina. One of the biggest things I’ve noticed this time around is that way too many of the characters in this book spout off trivial bits of information in an effort to make the events of the issue contextual or more emotional. About halfway through this book, that became really evident to me. Writer Brian K. Vaughan even pokes fun at it a few times with characters interrupting each other saying things like, “We don’t have time for that.” Unlike star Yorick’s annoying immaturity in the first volume, though, which is more an aspect of his character than a misfire by the author, this particular bit seems like a problem on the creative end.

Even though that got on my nerves while reading through this large volume, I still enjoyed this portion of the story, much of which I had forgotten after my first reading binge leading up to the book’s final issue. In the continued adventures of Yorick, Dr. Mann and Agent 355, we definitely hit some milestones and then kind of blow past them which is fun. This one volume includes Yorick finally giving into his primal urges, the beginning of Hero’s redemption, the reveal that Yorick’s girlfriend Beth is definitely alive, the crew getting to San Francisco, 355 facing off against some Culper Ring fanatics, Yorick almost dying, the explanation of why Yorick and Ampersand survived, a ninja, Ampersand getting monkeynapped, a transatlantic journey with lady pirates, an unexpected hook-up, a submarine, drugs and a few dream-based sci-fi and superhero vignettes that were a lot of fun.

It’s a lot and I liked the flow of the book. I like how, roughly at the halfway point, Vaughan decided to really open the story up and move around in this new world. It would have been easy to just stay in the U.S. and keep examining all of the crazy tiny groups that have popped up. I also like how casually the story transitioned to San Fran where Dr. Mann’s back-up samples were. One issues opens and, boom, they’re there and the city is actually pretty nice with the lights on and even pro basketball games in a stadium. It’s a pretty nice little set-up and you think, “Hey, good for them, they can finally relax,” and then BLAMMO Ampersand gets kidnapped by a ninja and the adventure continues. This also rekindles Yorick’s original goal which is to find his girlfriend Beth who just so happens to be going through a ton of crazy stuff on her own in Australia. There’s even a moment in the book where Yorick says he’s given up on that idea, but now that he’s sailing the seven seas, he’s back on that idea and it doesn’t seem as crazy as it did in the first book.

As an interesting aside, my wife and I just finished listening to the audiobook version of Brad Meltzer’s The Inner Circle which also features the Culper Ring. It’s interesting how these two writers used a historical idea and both went different ways with it. We don’t actually know much about the Ring in the world of Y, but we do know that they go by numbers — hence “Agent 355” — and seem to work in secret around the President and possibly above him or her. Meanwhile, Meltzer took the idea and continued it on, though instead of necessarily protecting the President, they protect the Presidency though sometimes a prez will create his own ring for various reasons. I can’t remember if there’s more about the Ring explained in Y, but I’m curious to see what else Vaughan does with it in the remaining two books.

Y: The Last Man Deluxe Volume 2 Trade Post

Y The Last Man Deluxe Volume 2 Y: The Last Man Deluxe Volume 2 (Vertigo/DC)
Written by Brian K. Vaughan, drawn by Pia Guerra with Paul Chadwick & Goran Parlov
Collects Y: The Last Man #11-23

My original intent when diving back into the wild world of Brian K. Vaughan’s Y: The Last Man was to focus on all five deluxe collections without jumping around. But, after reading the first volume, and reliving both the intensity of the series and some of Yorick Brown’s more annoying character ticks, I needed to take a break. So, I burned through a few trades that I’ll get around to reviewing soon enough, both to cleanse my palet a bit and also to get some of the books out of my “to read” long box (I’ve set up a lot of Sequential Swaps lately and had a good deal of books coming in).

Even after feeling pretty accomplished knocking a few books off the list, I was drawn right back to Y. This volume was split about 50/50 between stuff I remembered from my first reading of the book and stuff I didn’t remember at all. I remembered all the astronaut stuff pretty much down to the letter, though there were some surprises in who dies and who doesn’t. I also mostly remembered the mostly Yorick-less theater storyline which was a nice little treat. But then you’ve got the stuff with Agent 711 as well as the Sons of Arizona stuff which had completely slipped my mind. Even remembering some of the details, though, it’s all in how BKV tells the story that makes this such a great book to read.

My main complaint about the first volume was that Yorick can be an incredibly annoying character. He’s basically a smartass kid who’s done nothing with his life that loves making cultural references to make himself feel more worldly. When I was younger, I could relate to that a lot more, but now I just want this wiseacre to clam up. Just to clarify, that’s not a complaint about the writing. I think all of that is very purposeful on BKV’s part. Yorick’s whole journey about this series is to become a better, well-rounded human being (plus that whole saving the world thing). The beauty of this volume is that BKV shifts the focus from Yorick a bit before subjecting him to 711’s unique brand of therapy (man, what an intense string of issues!) which then leads into a story that starts showing how Yorick has changed. I’m not sure how these issues are broken up in the normal trades, but I thought it was a really interesting structure for this collection.

While reading through this volume I realized another element that makes this book so accessible to new readers and non-comic book fans and that is that the art is both realistic and cartoony. By realistic I mean that it’s not ultra-stylized and by cartoonish I mean that you could see this kind of art in something like a newspaper comic strip or a greeting card (I’m having trouble thinking of other places where non-comic fans see static art). This idea came to me while looking at a page and thinking something along the lines of, “This isn’t too far off from the kind of art you’d see in an Archie comic.” It’s an interesting thought because on one hand it almost lulls you into lowered expectations of what you’re going to see in the book and then you get some pretty insane stuff shown in that same style which makes it a bit more shocking and a bit more surprising.

Once again, I found myself needing a bit of a break after reading through these 13 issues so I’m probably going to throw up another Trade Post for Friday, but I’m already back into the series with about half of the third volume read just last night. There’s a lot going on and I think I’m about done with all the parts I actually remember from the series so this should be interesting.